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immigration, global and domestic movement of people to find jobs and livelihoods

Securing Justice for Waste/Recycling Workers

Thursday, September 22, 2011, 6:00 p.m. The Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA) and the Boston Recycling Coalition (BRC- an emerging campaign between community, environmental and worker groups in Boston to dramatically improve the recycling system in Boston) co-host a gathering of inspiring grassroots waste/recycling movement leaders from around the world. Following a panel, there will be a wide-ranging discussion between local recycling workers, international guests and members of the Boston community interested in improving dismal conditions in Boston's waste/recycling sector. Come join us! This event is organized by the Boston Recycling Coalition.

Crosby & McClain - New Lynn, MA: Safe, Decent & Just

Tuesday, September 20, 2011, 7:00 p.m. Join organizers Jeff Crosby and Carly McClain in a conversation about the Workers Center for Economic Justice organized by the North Shore Labor Council and the New Lynn Coalition. The coalition’s mission is to organize all sectors of working class people in the region into a unified permanent, political and economic force that is union and non-union and transcends racial, linguistic, ethnic, citizenship and gender boundaries. Together the organizations within the New Lynn Coalition are identifying goals for regional development which revolve around social and ecological needs and concerns and where there is a renewed sense of the public role in social welfare.

New Lynn, MA: Safe, Decent & Just

Tuesday, July 20th, 2011, 7:00 p.m.  Rescheduled due to another event. New date to be announced soon: Join organizers Jeff Crosby and Carly McClain in a conversation about the Workers Center for Economic Justice organized by the North Shore Labor Council and the New Lynn Coalition. The coalition’s mission is to organize all sectors of working class people in the region into a unified permanent, political and economic force that is union and non-union and transcends racial, linguistic, ethnic, citizenship and gender boundaries. Together the organizations within the New Lynn Coalition are identifying goals for regional development which revolve around social and ecological needs and concerns and where there is a renewed sense of the public role in social welfare.

No Word for Welcome: The Mexican Village Faces the Global Economy

Thursday, September 8th, 2011, 6:30 p.m. Wendy Call visited the Isthmus of Tehuantepec—the lush sliver of land connecting the Yucatan Peninsula to the rest of Mexico—for the first time in 1997. She found herself in the midst of a storied land, a place Mexicans call their country's “little waist,” a place long known for its strong women, spirited marketplaces, and deep sense of independence. She also landed in the middle of a ferocious battle over plans to industrialize the region, where most people still fish, farm, and work in the forests. In the decade that followed her first visit, Call witnessed farmland being paved for new highways, oil spilling into rivers, and forests burning down. Through it all, local people fought to protect their lands and their livelihoods—and their very lives.

Hillbilly Nationalists, Radical Greasers, & Black Power

Monday, October 17, 2011, 7:00 p.m. The historians of the late 1960s have emphasized the work of a small group of white college activists and the Black Panthers, activists who courageously took to the streets to protest the war in Vietnam and continuing racial inequality. Poor and working-class whites have tended to be painted as spectators, reactionaries, and, even, racists. Most Americans, the story goes, just watched the political movements of the sixties go by.

James Tracy and Amy Sonnie, who have been interviewing activists from the 1960s for nearly ten years, reject this old narrative. In five tightly conceived chapters, they show that poor and working-class whites, inspired by the Civil Rights Movement and the Black Panther Party, started to organize significant political movements against racism and inequality during the 1960s.

Racial Justice Battles of the Forties & Fifties

Friday, June 24, 2011, 6:30 p.m. Join activist historian Mark Solomon for reflection on the racial justice battles of the 1940s and 50s - that great in-between period that provided the connective tissue between the great upsurges of the 1930s and powerful peace and justice movements of the 1960s. Going beyond mere generational analysis, this personal account integrates race, class and gender dimensions with a global perspective in an era when such transformative figures as Paul Robeson and W.E.B du Bois were still widely recognized and respected. In a period largely defined by the Cold War, other exciting processes ranging from epic national liberation struggles in the Global South to block-by-block tenant organizing in the US. Mark takes us back to that period and our discussion will help draw lessons for today's challenges. The event will be followed by a wine-and-cheese-style reception. 

After the Elections: Where Do We Go from Here?

Monday, November 15, 2010, 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. The “One Nation Working Together” rally brought together an unprecedented progressive coalition in Washington on October 2. Nationally, One Nation plans to continue its ambitious collaboration effort after the November election -- when such collaboration between labor, civil rights, environmental, social justice, housing, peace and youth groups will be more important than ever.

Indigenous Virtue – Beyond Green Capitalism

Saturday, February 13, 2010, 6:00 p.m. Join Victor Wallis and Sylvia Escarcega in a discussion concerning the potential political and ethical contributions of indigenous thought and social movements to building alternatives to capitalism. Victor's paper, "Beyond 'Green Capitalism'" recently published in Monthly Review (61:9, February, 2010) provides a starting point for the conversation. In it, he notes the connection between the present economic recession, the crisis-ridden character of capitalist economy and the ecological limits to the capitalist growth model. But he goes on to observe that most of the world is still caught up in capitalist institutions and does not yet recognize the link between socialism and ecologically appropriate responses. He finds hope and examples in the Global South, insurgent socialism and indigenous resistance. Of the latter, he writes, "they express, more completely than any other demographic group, the common survival interest of humanity as a whole." Victor then traces how indigenous values may be connected to the "vast learning process... that revolution has always entailed." In doing so, Victor connects these values with on-the-ground practices while also addressing the international relations dimension.

Victor is editor of "Socialism and Democracy" and teaches political science at Berkelee School of Music. Sylvia teaches Latin American & Latino Studies at De Paul University.

The event is free and open to all interested members of the progressive community.

Workers Rights with Steve Early, Dorotea Manuela & Camilo Viveiros

Thursday, February 4, 2010, 7:00 p.m. In the face of a deepening economic crisis and continuing brutal raids on immigrant workers and their communities, this event brings together union workers, immigrant organizers and community activists. It is part of the campaign by the Boston May Day Committee and its affiliates to unite workers across sector and borders. Join the conversation and help build toward May Day 2010!

Visit BostonMayDay.org for more information 

HR-4321: Comprehensive Immigration Reform in Age of Obama

A Discussion with Aarti Shahani, Mizue Aizeki & Joe Nevins

Wednesday, December 30, 2009, 5:30 p.m. Immigration reform will soon be on the national legislative agenda. All options on the table punish immigrants for global economic and policy failures. To consider the different bills, in particular the one that many progressives may offer critical support--HR 4321 aka the Guiterrez Bill--three important thinkers, Aarti Shahani (founder of Families for Freedom), Mizue Aizeki and Joseph Nevins (most recently authors of Dying to Live: A Story of U.S. Immigration in an Age of Global Apartheid) will join us for an early evening conversation and light dinner.

See here for summaries: 1. from the Immigration Policy Institute (this is an Adobe Acrobat [PDF] file)

SIM: Dream Act Community Meeting

Tuesday, June 2, 2009, 7:00 p.m. Student leaders from across the country are organizing to create momentum around the Dream Act, on June 3rd-5th SIM leaders from Massachusetts will be traveling to Washington DC to meet with another 500 leaders of immigrant communities from all around the country. They will be also lobbying their congressman/woman on the Dream Act and Comprehensive Immigration Reform.

Before their departure to DC, Student Immigrant Movement leaders will host a "Dream Act Community Meeting" to have a discussion about the strategy and current situation of the bill nationally. It will be a space for students, educators, community leaders and parents to connect.

Anti-Immigrant Raids: Organizing Radical Solutions

Sunday, April 26, 2009, 2:00 - 5:00 p.m. This is a follow up meeting. The first was convened by Mata Hari and drew together a broad range of pro-immigrant organizations to discuss responses to the continuing raids on immigrant communities.

Outrage about the Raids: Radical Solutions Needed

Sunday, April 5, 2009, 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. Mata Hari and a broad range of pro-immigrant organizations are meeting to discuss responses to the continuing raids on immigrant communities.

Send-off to Belem & WSF 2009

Saturday, January 17, 2009, 6:00 p.m. Members of the Boston delegation to the eighth World Social Forum (Belem, Brazil) will begin the evening by discussing their objectives for the forum, then moving onto identify the forum's contributions and closing by stating how the want the forum to evolve. Topics to be covered include solidarity economics, the human right to water, migration and global social movements. The event will be followed by informal conversation and music from Brazil. There will also be an auction to benefit the Global Economic Alternatives Network (GEAN).